Last edited by Shalkis
Sunday, July 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Spindle whorls in archaeology found in the catalog.

Spindle whorls in archaeology

Louis C. Raymond

Spindle whorls in archaeology

by Louis C. Raymond

  • 48 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Museum of Anthropology, University of Northern Colorado in Greeley, Colo .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Archaeology -- Field methods.,
  • Spindle-whorls.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Louis C. Raymond.
    SeriesOccasional publications in anthropology., no. 30-30b
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsF1346 .O25 no. 30-30b, CC76 .O25 no. 30-30b
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 v. (viii, 252 leaves) :
    Number of Pages252
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2667106M
    LC Control Number85621923

    Saturday, 16th June am - pm. Location: The Antoinette Park. Access this ancient technology in a small group. Create your own yarn, using a hand : Mobile-Archaeology.   The typical spindle of Ancient Greece is still used today; a drop spindle, consisting of the long, thin staff of the spindle itself; a weight, called a whorl, or a sphóndylos, that allows the spindle to be suspended from the hand and to spin longer for each individual spin; and a hook, called a ánkistron, which guides the spun thread and.

    Spindle whorls and pottery were household items whose markings are interpreted either as signs of ownership or potter's marks, or as prophylactic symbols. Figurines were ritual items incised during cult practice. These symbols bore a magico-religious connotation. They were associated with ideas and may have acquired the value of work-signs. Con-. Archaeological Newsletter No. 9, January - Main Articles include: Recent London Excavations: A Survey of the finds, Excavations at the Meare Lake Village, , Archaeology in Wales, , Part 1. by Various, and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at

    Aztec Spindle Whorls and Their Iconography Spindle whorls is a relatively common artefact in Aztec archaeological excavations (Brumfiel ), and can be grouped into two categories: large ones for spinning agave fiber and smaller ones (typically measuring between Fig. 3. Nahua couples as represented in Anales de Tepeaca (c. ,Author: Jesper Nielsen. In Yutopian, Gero describes how archaeologists from the United States and Argentina worked with local residents to uncover the lifeways of the earliest sedentary people of the region. Gero foregounds many experiential aspects of archaeological fieldwork that are usually omitted in the archaeological literature: the tedious labor and constraints.


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Spindle whorls in archaeology by Louis C. Raymond Download PDF EPUB FB2

Spindle whorls are not necessary for making cords or threads, although they vastly improve the process, and they appear in the archaeological record during the Neolithic period worldwide at various times (the "Neolithic package" including agriculture and other complexities appeared in different places at different times around the world).

The earliest example I found in the literature is. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Raymond, Louis C.

Spindle whorls in archaeology. Greeley, Colo.: Museum of Anthropology, University of Northern Colorado. Spindle whorls in Archaeology No. 30 and No. 30b Hardcover – January 1, by Louis C. Raymond (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Hardcover, January 1, Author: Louis C. Raymond. The field of archaeological textiles is a difficult specialty since most of the material deteriorates rapidly. Because they are so ephemeral, it is a rare occasion when prehistoric textiles are recovered.

However, we do have many of the tools used for making textiles that include spindle whorls, loom weights, combs, and other objects associated with the craft. This page catalogues textile. “Archaeologists probably did not expect spindle whorls to have inscriptions, so these objects were not analyzed in this respect,” she said.

The letters spell the man’s name Hoten, and may. Spindle Whorls in British Columbia. Part 1. Introduction and Spindle Whorls in the Archaeology Collection of the Royal B.C. Museum. By Grant Keddie, Curator of Archaeology. Introduction. In order to provide a broader understanding of the earlier history and origins of both historic and pre-contact spindleFile Size: 4MB.

A spindle whorl is a disc or spherical object fitted onto the spindle to increase and maintain the speed of the spin. For ages the whorls have been made of many different materials: amber, antler, bone, ceramic, coral, glass, metal (iron, lead, lead alloy), and wood ().Some types of local materials have been also used, such as chalk, limestone, mudstone, sandstone, slate, and soapstone.

Discover the best Archaeology in Best Sellers. Find the top most popular items in Amazon Books Best Sellers. - Explore DaFrogg's board "spindle whorls" on Pinterest. See more ideas about Drop spindle, Iron age and Fiber art pins. The Buckquoy spindle-whorl is an Ogham-inscribed spindle-whorl dating from the Early Middle Ages, probably the 8th century, which was found in in Buckquoy, Birsay, Orkney, Scotland.

Made of sandy limestone, it is about 36 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick. It is the only known spindle-whorl with an Ogham inscription. The inscription was once used as proof that the Pictish language was not. Changes in the methodology of Cypriot archaeology are reflected in the quality of the data available on spindle whorls and it has, therefore, not been possible to satisfactorily resolve some of the research aims.

It is hoped that an understanding of the functional aspects ofwhorls will encourage useful recording of attributes in the future.

Large Roman spindle whorl, c. 1st-3rd century AD. With an accompanying note reading 'Pottery spindle-whorl found in the ruins of the Roman Haltern Museum, Westphalia, ' and with 'Haltern, (Westp.) ' written on the piece in ink. 1 3/8" (35 mm).

Ex Hertfordshire, England. 3 Nov - Explore nfberry40's board "Lead spindle whorls" on Pinterest. See more ideas about Metal spindles, Drop spindle and Sea urchin shell pins. The rich assortment of articles accompanying the ashes of the dead - contained in typical biconical funeral urns or recuperated from the large “dolii” in which the dead were interred - offer useful information and trace a sort of identity card of the individual: weapons denote a warrior, whereas jewels, accessories, objects for body-care and instruments of work can be indicative of a woman.

Read more about The Contribution of Experimental Archaeology in Addressing the Analysis of Residues on Spindle-Whorls Book Review: A Handbook for Men's Clothing of the Late 15th Century by Anna Malmborg & Willhelm Schütz. The Book of Mormon uses the word “wheel” only once in 2 Nephiwhich is a quotation from Isaiah.

The implied use of wheels in the Book of Mormon comes from the seven references to chariots. The first reference is found in 2 Nephialso a quotation from Isaiah. Seven spindle whorls used as weights while spinning wool. These are an example of recycling and imaginative use of materials by the Romans.

The top right red spindle whorl is a reworked samian base while the flat examples are made from domestic grey ware 57 pins.

Archaeological excavations recover a wide variety of materials that were created and used by the ancient Maya. Containers were often made out of pottery. Clay was also modelled and fired into pendents and figurines. Many items were made from stone.

Arrowpoints, knives, drills, oddly- shaped objects, and jewelry were made from chert and obsidian. Limestone. Spindle whorls. A study of form, function and decoration in Prehistoric Bronze Age Cyprus. Jonsered: Paul Äströms förlag.

Studies in Mediterranean Archaeology Pocket-book Dikaios, P. The excavations at Vounous-Bellapais in Cyprus –2, Cited by: 4. Archaeology, or archeology (from Greek ἀρχαιολογία, archaiologia – ἀρχαῖος, arkhaīos, "ancient"; and -λογία, -logiā, "-logy"), is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture and environmental data which they have left behind, which includes artefacts, architecture, biofacts and cultural landscapes (the archaeological record).

Search text. Search type Research Explorer Website Staff directory. Alternatively, use our A–Z indexAuthor: L. Crewe.Woodstown: A Viking-Age settlement in Waterford.

Fierce and wild is the wind to-night, It tosses the tresses of the sea to white; On such a night as this I take my ease; Fierce Northmen only course the quiet wrote an Irish monk in the margin of an Irish copy of a Latin and Greek grammar book that he was studying in an unknown Irish monastery in the mid-ninth century.of a long-term interest in archaeology, but for others it was their first foray into the practice of painstakingly uncovering pieces of vitrified rubble, old stone flags, pieces of charcoal, spindle whorls and other artefacts, sometimes not immediately.